FAMILY
FIRST

POLICE officer, Husband, father,
first in family: tREVOR BERTRAM

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I think the most important change is mental. I no longer think of food as a comfort object or no longer snack just to pass time. I still eat your typical "comfort" food, but it's no longer as a reward for going to the gym or being "good" on my diet. I finally view food as what it is, my body's fuel. I still enjoy fun foods and treats with my daughters and family, but I now know how to eat like an adult to balance this out. ”

Tell us a little bit about yourself...

My name is Trevor and I’m 27 years old. I currently work as a Patrolman in a resort town in Tennessee where I live with my wife and two daughters. And dog. And cat. 

What brought you to the First In Family initially?

Steve Bogle introduced me to the First In Family initially. I had worked with Steve in the past and when he told me about First In, I looked into it online, and knew it was the place for me to succeed.

I was drawn to the family atmosphere, everyone is eager to help and share their own struggles for people to learn from. 

Tell us a little bit about your background and history with food.

My background with food was pretty common I feel. After I finished high school sports I continued to eat like I was still a high school athlete. It didn’t take long for that to catch up to me. I used the latest and greatest fad diets to lose weight fast, only to gain it and more back.

My biggest struggles and contributing factors was shift work. I started early in EMS, just six months out of high school. Fast food for breakfast and lunch, then a big home cooked meal at the station every 24 hour shift. When I transitioned into Law Enforcement I started as a Corrections Officer, fast food on my way into work, snack machines at work, and fast food after my shift.

For years I never made a plan when it came to food, eating on the go, whatever and however much sounded good at the time. 

What was the turning point in your life when you realized you needed to make a change?

My first lightbulb moment was when I stepped on a scale and seen 310 pounds, I was trapped and had no idea how to break the vicious cycle. I crashed dieted, cut carbs, and starved myself before being hired as a Patrolman, where I went to the academy at about 260 pounds.

Following the academy I was weighing around 240, but working in a tourist town proved to be a struggle. All that good vacation food every day and within 2 years I was back up to almost 280. I couldn’t effectively do my job, I couldn’t be a good father. 

What was the journey like and what changes did you make?

The changes were mostly all food related. I had a good strength training regiment, but without the proper diet it wasn’t cutting it.

You’ve probably heard the saying, “You can’t out train a bad diet”. Before making the jump into working with First In, I eyeballed my food and loosely tracked it in My Fitness Pal. This of course worked, but it wasn’t a long term fix. I slowly started weighing all my food, first maybe just a meal a day to get comfortable with it, then slowly it became every meal. 

How do you feel after making those changes?

The most obvious change of course is physical. It’s the first thing you and everyone else sees. The changes in clothing sizes, time it takes to find clothes in a store, or even the time it takes to tie my shoes.

But, I think the most important change is mental. I no longer think of food as a comfort object or no longer snack just to pass time. I still eat your typical “comfort” food, but it’s no longer as a reward for going to the gym or being “good” on my diet. I finally view food as what it is, my body’s fuel. I still enjoy fun foods and treats with my daughters and family, but I now know how to eat like an adult to balance this out. 

What did your friends/family think of your transformation?

My wife and the rest of my family have been very supportive during this journey, which I am fortunate for.

Of course you will have the person that doesn’t see the work you put in day in and day out to make this work, and you’ll get the occasional joke about being obsessed or crazy from them.  I try to take it as an opportunity to explain why I’m doing it or just joke it off with them.

Were you active or did you workout during your journey?

I’ve been active during this journey, strength training four times a week and some cardio. My form of cardio includes slow walks or maybe some sprints, never more than an hour a week. 

What does being First In mean to you?

Being First In to me means being the best version of myself. For my family, my community, and for myself. 

What’s next for you and where do you see this journey taking you in the future?

I honestly don’t think the journey ever ends. I’m 89 weeks into this journey and I still feel like I can improve. I mean, after all, this is your health and livelihood that is being changed.

As far as the next goal, I’m feeling good with where I am body weight and composition wise, so for the time being maintaining.

And maybe perfecting my protein pancake game. 

What was the biggest challenge or change when you started with First In and how did you overcome it?

Like I said, I had already been weighing food and using My Fitness Pal prior to starting the journey, I think my biggest challenge was taking weekly pictures of myself. It was just something I wasn’t comfortable with, I was always trying to avoid being in pictures and then all of a sudden I was having to be the main focus. But, after a couple months it just became a part of my Sunday routine. 

What are your top 5 "secrets" for success?

1- Buy a travel scale and put it in the glove box of your primary vehicle.

2- Don’t compare your progress pictures early on, I went almost a year without looking back at any of mine.

3- Have go-to meals that you can make or grab on the go to keep you on track without a lot of thought when you’re busy.

4- Buy an air fryer, everything is better air fried.

5- Coffee and bouillon cubes in hot water (“meat tea”) are your friends when you start a deficit.
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any advice for someone thinking about getting started?

It’s worth every penny.

You’re body and health will thank you in the long run.

It’s hard and takes time at first, but with a little hard work and patience it will become an important part of your day and before you know it, you’ll be looking and feeling better.

ARE YOU READY TO BE FIRST IN?

Contact us for more info:

ARE YOU READY TO BE FIRST IN?

Contact us for more info:

Testimonials were given freely and service members did not receive any preferential treatment, discount, or other benefit due to the nature of their service, rank, or position and in no way are the views or beliefs of any branch of the armed forces or uniformed services.